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How long do your cows receive close-up diets?

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Dairy basics - Feed and Nutrition
Written by Gene Boomer   
Friday, 20 February 2015 15:16

Properly formulated transition cow rations are an integral part of transition period success. Producers and nutritionists often spend a good deal of attention to getting these diets just right and then adjusting as necessary.

However, the best ration in the world does no good if animals do not receive it. When troubleshooting rations, it’s not uncommon to find that transition cows and first-calf heifers do not receive the rations as nutritionists and managers intended.

 

Silage contaminants: Observations and implications

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Dairy basics - Feed and Nutrition
Written by Keith A. Bryan   
Friday, 06 February 2015 15:29

There are two main classes of fungi that can be observed during the harvest, storage and feedout of ensiled forages: single cell yeasts and multicellular filamentous colonies of molds. In the field, fungal diseases of corn are characterized by yield and quality loss, and mycotoxin contamination.

 

The language of nutrition: MP (Metabolizable protein)

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Dairy basics - Feed and Nutrition
Written by Gustavo Cruz   
Wednesday, 04 February 2015 10:48

q
In layman’s terms, what does metabolizable protein (MP) mean?


Metabolizable protein (MP) is the total amount of amino acid absorbed in the small intestine. The main sources of amino acid to the intestine are rumen-undegradable protein (RUP), microbial crude protein (MCP), and to a lesser extent, endogenous crude protein (ECP).

 

Dairy nutrition terminology for new employees

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Dairy basics - Feed and Nutrition
Written by Mathew Haan   
Wednesday, 04 February 2015 10:28

The costs to produce milk continue to increase. Feed is the largest cost on the dairy, so it is important for dairy employees and individuals in industries that support dairies to have at least a basic understanding of nutritional terminology.

 

Why didn’t it ferment?

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Dairy basics - Feed and Nutrition
Written by Keith A. Bryan   
Wednesday, 04 February 2015 10:12

boxing bacteriaWhy didn’t it ferment? This question arises more often than you may think.

Having reviewed and shared the results of several thousand forage samples in the past few years, when the fermentation profile does not conform to the dairyman’s expectation, invariably the question is asked, “Why didn’t it ferment?”

 

Are you measuring what you think you are with feed shrink?

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Dairy basics - Feed and Nutrition
Written by Ed DePeters and Bill Weiss   
Tuesday, 03 February 2015 16:27

Feed accounts for more than 50 percent of the costs of milk production. There are numerous causes associated with feed shrinkage on a dairy. There can be losses of feed weight related to harvesting, delivery, storage, handling, mixing and delivering.

 

Consider the source when supplementing lysine

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Dairy basics - Feed and Nutrition
Written by Jessica Tekippe   
Tuesday, 03 February 2015 16:12

Most dairy nutritionists report that they balance the amino acid levels in their dairy rations to bolster income over feed cost (IOFC). Typically, this includes the use of supplemental methionine and lysine, the first two limiting amino acids.

They are limiting because, when in short supply, they can limit herd performance. Supplementation is required as they do not naturally occur in high enough levels in feedstuffs to meet dairy cow needs.

 

Mycotoxins and binders

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Dairy basics - Feed and Nutrition
Written by John Hibma   
Tuesday, 03 February 2015 15:59

Many dairy farmers have had times when the cows back off on feed consumption for no apparent reason and milk production drops. Then just as mysteriously, everything returns to normal. The conception rate may drop for a month – and it too then returns to normal.

 


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