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Herd Health

Find information about mastitis, transition cows, vaccination protocols, working with your veterinarian, hoof care and hoof trimming.

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This is the second article discussing transition cow management. In the first article (January 1, 2010), I discussed the importance of tracking the many complex cow issues associated with parturition. In this article, I will discuss a few approaches to manage cows during the transition period to minimize the long-lasting effects of ‘parturition complex’ on cow performance. With milk prices better than last year and cow inventories generally low, now is an excellent time to maximize production per cow by managing the transition period.

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In North America alone, there are over 700 species of flies that belong to the Muscidae (filth fly) group. Probably the single-most common of these is the house fly. No geographic locations or socioeconomic communities are spared the constant presence of the house fly. While they don’t bite, this fly’s habit of constantly crawling on nearly every surface – particularly manure – makes them very undesirable to have around.

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Mastitis in dairy cattle is very common during the dry period and early lactation. Intramammary infections (IMI) observed during the dry period can be due to a subclinical infection (presence of bacteria without signs of inflammation) carried into the dry period from the previous lactation (pre-existing infections), or those acquired at the period between drying off and calving (new infections).

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Admit it. Biosecurity is one of those areas you try to address, but the nature of your business prevents you from doing anything really meaningful, right?

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As most of America is struggling through one of the coldest winters in recent memory, dairy producers must start planning for the annual summertime problem of heat stress. While we long for warmer temperatures, heat stress can result in significant losses on the dairy.

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The most significant and economically important pest to dairymen is the biting stable fly. It is often referred to as the beach fly, dog fly, lawn mower fly and other names, some not printable. They attack most mammals, including cattle, horses, sheep, goats, swine, dogs and humans. If you have flies feeding on your cows’ legs or flanks, causing them to be nervous and constantly stomp and switch, you probably have a stable fly problem that is costing you money.

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