Current Progressive Dairy digital edition
Advertisement

Managers Academy 2010

PD Editor Walt Cooley Published on 27 January 2010

Jim and Andy Werkhoven

More than 75 dairy producers and allied industry leaders convened in Seattle, Washington, for the sixth annual Managers Academy.

advertisement

advertisement

The three-day event included executive-level training by business coaches Dr. David Kohl and David Parker and a day of tours to agricultural businesses in the Seattle area, including Werkhoven Dairy Farm in Monroe, Washington; Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery and Pike Place Fish Market in downtown Seattle.

During his presentation, Kohl used a football analogy to describe the future U.S. economic landscape. Most business success would be won through “running and defense,” not passing and over-the-top offense, he said. Available cash will unlock opportunities.

Kohl challenged producers to consider the possibility of a small federal interest rate change. Although not likely immediately, he said change is inevitable as there’s no where for federal rates to go but up.

“How would a 1 to 2 percent change in interest rates change your business plan?” Kohl asked. “A small change in interest rates could eat up a bigger portion of any profits you have.”

Kohl said although the U.S. economy looks good on the surface much of the growth has been generated from government stimulus money. This year will be more revealing as to long-term sustainable U.S. economic growth. PD

advertisement

TOP LEFT: Dairymen Jim and Andy Werkhoven in Monroe, Washington, explain how they've partnered with a local Native American tribe to create a community digester that uses their manure and other substrates to generate power.

Karla Chambers of Stahlbush Island Farms in Corvallis, Oregon, told producers her fruit and vegetable farm has been successful because she’s listened to her customers who are mostly female. She challenged dairy producers, who are often men, to learn more about young and female grocery store consumers and how they shop for dairy products. Chambers and Darigold Senior Vice President Steve Rowe fielded producer questions during a panel discussion.

Karla Chambers of Stahlbush Island Farms in Corvallis, Oregon, told producers her fruit and vegetable farm has been successful because she’s listened to her customers who are mostly female. She challenged dairy producers, who are often men, to learn more about young and female grocery store consumers and how they shop for dairy products. Chambers and Darigold Senior Vice President Steve Rowe fielded producer questions during a panel discussion.

Dr. David Kohl reviewed the current status of the U.S. economy. He told attendees, “We are at an inflection point in the U.S. economy. We will either find new economic engines or become more European in our production/supply management.”

Dr. David Kohl reviewed the current status of the U.S. economy. He told attendees, “We are at an inflection point in the U.S. economy. We will either find new economic engines or become more European in our production/supply management.”

Wisconsin dairyman Mark Diedrich catches a “flying fish” at Pike Place Market in downtown Seattle. Attendees toured the market and met the “world-famous” Pike Place Fish Throwers.

advertisement

Wisconsin dairyman Mark Diedrich catches a “flying fish” at Pike Place Market in downtown Seattle. Attendees toured the market and met the “world-famous” Pike Place Fish Throwers.

Walt Cooley
  • Walt Cooley

  • Editor
  • Email Walt Cooley

LATEST BLOG

LATEST NEWS