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Summit to feature Pittsburgh Steeler, Domino’s spokesperson

PD Editor Emily Caldwell Published on 18 January 2013

The annual Pennsylvania Dairy Summit will take place Feb. 6-7, 2013 at the Lancaster Host Resort in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Progressive Dairyman recently reached out to some of the presenters and asked them to provide a preview of their upcoming topics.

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OPENING AND FEATURED SESSION PREVIEWS: Speakers and topics are in italics
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Scott Stewart, CEO, Stewart-Peterson Inc.
Topic:: 2013 Dairy Industry Outlook

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Why is this topic important?

STEWART: Understanding possible price scenarios for feed and milk in 2013 is important because, in a potentially high-feed-cost environment, producers will want to do all they can to protect what they have worked so hard to build. I will paint a picture of possible scenarios – however, I will also encourage producers to be prepared for multiple scenarios.

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Success in 2013 will not be because someone “guessed right” and achieved an optimal price. That does happen once in a while; however, guessing wrong can have far more devastating effects. And so we teach producers not to hinge their pricing decisions on market outlook, and instead to be prepared for whatever the volatile markets dish out.

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What do you hope attendees will take away from your presentation?

STEWART: I hope producers gain a sense of confidence, so that as we head into 2013 producers do not feel like victims of a volatile market that is out of their control. In today’s world we are seeing that “random” and “unlikely” events happen with more frequency, and the businesses that survive embrace the unpredictability and position themselves to be ready for anything. I would like to help producers hold their heads high and stride through 2013 as victors, not victims.

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Tim Strobel and Daphne and Lloyd Holterman.
Topic: Producer Showcase ~ Rosy-Lane Holsteins

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The Holtermans, along with Strobel, farm 1,100 acres and milk 825 cows on their Watertown, Wisconsin, operation. Their progressive breeding program has resulted in more than 60 bulls sold to A.I. companies.

As of January 1, the couple has brought another partner, Jordan Matthews, into the operation. We asked Lloyd to describe what he and Daphne plan to talk about.

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Why would information about Rosy-Lane Holsteins be valuable to attendees?

HOLTERMAN: Rosy-Lane Holsteins has gone from 100 cows to 900 cows in the last 16 years. Developing a cohesive workforce has led to higher, consistent performance and steady profits over time. Our herd management system utilizes the Afi-Milk program, which has dramatically increased labor and parlor efficiency. We focus on quality and quantity. The recent change in a chopper processor from traditional to shredlage has had very promising early results. We are slowly transitioning ownership of our business to two young former employees to allow the business to grow long term.

q

What do you hope attendees will take away from your presentation?

HOLTERMAN: Our year after year consistent growth and progress are not achieved by a magic bullet but by utilizing every asset to its fullest nearly every day:

• development of mid-managers from within, and cross-training employees

• Benchmarking with two groups, Wisconsin and northeast U.S. farmers, helps us hone in areas to improve in

• Custom harvest services for neighbors to offset expensive equipment

• Comprehensive herd management system leads to 1.7 lbs milk marketed per lb dry matter fed

• 95 percent genomic bulls used, which leads to sales to A.I. industry that help offset semen costs

• Active farm transition program

• Anticipating regulations/requirements and implementing programs to improve overall processes and safety at the farm ( OSHA , F.A.R.M., DNR CAFO permit, Nutrient Management and more)

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Ben Mullen, Good View Farm, Canton, Pennsylvania
Topic: Next Generation of Growth in Pennsylvania (Mullen will be one of three producers featured as part of a producer panel)

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Why is this topic important?

MULLEN: This topic is important because of the increasing global demand for food. The next generation of dairy farmers has a great opportunity to provide for that need by carrying on a legacy of successful and well-established farms. The next generation needs to use technology and innovation to remain profitable and efficient.

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What do you hope attendees will take away from the panel discussion?

MULLEN: I would like to see people encouraged and excited about farming. We need to learn about and take advantage of opportunities to be the next generation of growth in Pennsylvania.

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Brandon Solano, Vice President of Brand Innovation, Domino’s
Topic: A Customer Showcase: Domino’s

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Why is this topic important?

SOLANO: This topic is important because 25 percent of cheese in the U.S. is eaten on a pizza.

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What do you hope attendees will take away from your presentation?


SOLANO:
I hope attendees learn how the partnership between Domino’s and Dairy Management, Inc. is transforming the pizza category to drive dairy sales.

EARLY-BIRD CASE STUDIES
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Tim Beck and Rebecca White, Penn State extension dairy specialists
Topic: Knowing Your Numbers

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Why is this topic important?

WHITE: “Knowing your numbers” is incredibly important for dairy producers and their advisers because business and management decisions need to be based on data from an individual farm. What may work on your neighbor’s farm may not be economical on yours. With margins becoming tighter, it’s even more important for maximum utilization of all assets, including cows and crop acres.

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What do you hope attendees will take away from this presentation?


WHITE:
Attendees will take away from this presentation examples of real farm opportunities in Pennsylvania to increase efficient utilization of crop acres, maximize home-raised feeds and decrease costs with sound investments.
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Melissa Osgood and Cindy Weimer,
Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association
Topic: Understanding and Preparing for Animal Activism

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Why is this topic important?

OSGOOD AND WEIMER: Animal activists continue to successfully use undercover video investigations to undermine public trust in today’s farms and food. Even the best-managed farm can become a target by activists who are skilled at getting hired at the farm, building rapport with farm workers and identifying or instigating on-farm behaviors to capture and position negatively on video. We need to be proactive in maintaining consumer trust in dairy farms and dairy foods.

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What do you hope attendees will take away from this presentation?


OSGOOD AND WEIMER:
We hope participants gain a better understanding of how and why these investigations are effective so that they can proactively prepare for and prevent such an investigation on their farm. We also want to emphasize the resources available to dairy farmers through the local dairy checkoff programs in helping them manage such an incident.

The 2013 Pennsylvania Dairy Summit will also feature a motivational message from former Pittsburgh Steeler Rocky Bleier.

To learn more about the Dairy Summit and to register, click here or call the Professional Dairy Managers of Pennsylvania at (814) 355-2467. PD
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Emily Caldwell
Editor
Progressive Dairyman

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